the Peppermint Trolley Company – ‘It’s a Lazy Summer Day’ in the Summer of Love

August 31, 2016 in Events

During the winter of 1967 my brother Jimmy and I continued to drive into Holly wood

Three weeks later...

Casey Cunningham, Jimmy Faragher, And Danny Farsagher

on the week-ends to record with Producer Dan Dalton. In addition to cutting three sides
as the Peppermint Trolley Company, we sang and played background for other artists.
A 45 single of ‘She’s the Kind of Girl’/’Little Miss Sunshine’ was released on Dalton’s
Kelly label before being picked up by Acta Records.

In the meantime the world around us seemed to accelerate. Along with our drummer
friend, Casey Cunningham, and new found buddy, Patrick McClure, we became active
in the Peace Movement and, dare I say it, slightly psychedelicized.  We were listening to
a wide range of artists, including the Doors, the Jefferson Airplane, the Paul Butterfield
Blues Band, Phil Ochs, and Laura Nyro.  We understood that Acta had signed us with the
expectation that we would deliver light pop fare (a genre that is now refered to as sunshine pop).
Although we were confident we could provide that kind of sound, we were filled with creative
energy and chaffing at the leash. Our dream was to form a real band with Casey on the drums
and to come up with an original sound.

In May Jimmy wrote a song that seemed to encapsulate the moment. It was called ‘It’s a Lazy
Summer Day’.  Melodic, dreamy and innocent, it was like a flower-child anthem. The three
of us played it for  Dan and his wife, Lois Fletcher, and they both loved it. Within the week
we were in Moonglow Studio to lay it down before summer. It was the first PTC record on
which we cut our own basic track, which was recorded live with Jimmy on bass, Casey on
drums, and me on the Hammond B3. Danish singer/songwriter James Fleming Rasmussen
played the acoustic guitar. The vocal arrangement was done on the spot as we stood in frontLazy summer Day(2)
of the mic.

As we listened to the rough mix, the excitement in the room was palpable. By God, we had
our own sound! The harmonies and counter points were sophisticated and psychedelic, while
the organ intro and outro gave it a baroque flavor.Yes, it was light and breezy but it was also
organic and honest. Amidst  the song’s carefree innocence a darker reality was implied – ‘No
one wants to start a fight/ So let’s take a walk tonight.’   It was like a blossom in
the barrel of an M16. We’d managed to stay in the ballpark while pouring a little magic
mushroom powder into the soda.

Acta president, Kenny Meyers, was crazy about it and decided to do a rush release. By July,
‘It’s a Lazy Summer Day’  was pressed and ready to be shipped (Listen here.) One
morning, three weeks later I received a phone call  on my folk’s phone. On the line was Bob
McCormack, the program director for radio station KMEN 129 in San Bernardino. He had
just read the rave reviews of our record  in Billboard, Cashbox , and Record World. Man, was
he pumped.  ‘Danny, we’re going to bring this one home for you guys!’ he told me. That
day we heard ‘A Lazy Summer Day’  on the radio. The Summer of Love was in full swing.

PTC with T. Michael Jordan

Peppermint Trolley Company with KMEN DJ, T. Michael Jordan

 

Fiftieth Anniversary of the Peppermint Trolley Company Recording Debut

August 26, 2016 in Happenings

Selma and Cosmo, Moonglow Studio and the infamous 1966 Hollywood Sunset Strip Curfew Riot

 

Hard to believe, but it has been a half century since my brother Jimmy and I
stepped into Moonglow, a small studio that stood at the corner of Selma and
Cosmo in Hollywood, California, to record the P.F. Sloan penned ‘Lollipop Train’

The Mark V line-up: Danny Faragher, Dave Kelliher, Brad Madson, Dick Owens, Jimmy Faragher, and Steve Hauser

The Mark V line-up: Danny Faragher, Dave Kelliher, Brad Madson, Dick Owens, Jimmy Faragher, and Steve Hauser

and our own ‘Bored to Tears’ for Valiant Records. It was to be our first record
using the moniker ‘ThePeppermint Trolley Company’. At the time the two of us
were members of the Mark V, a band that had been together since 1962. Having
already released three singles for Impression Records, we weren’t complete novices,
but we were still pretty green. At the urging of producer Dan Dalton, we changed
our name and began to focus in a new direction, striving for a more polished sound
with the accent on the vocal arrangements.

When we arrived in the summer of 1966 the city teaming with creativity. With new
sounds emerging from L.A based bands like Love, the Buffalo Springfield, the Doors
and Frank Zappa’s Mothers of Invention, it was an incredible year for popular music.
The Beatles, Beach Boys, and Rolling Stones had recently released ‘Revolver’, ‘Pet
Sounds’, and ‘Aftermath’, respectively, pushing the boundaries of rock music. There
was a buzz in the air, and the Hollywood music scene was alive and well with numerous
rock clubs like the’Trip’, ‘Pandora’s Box’, and  ‘Bido Lido’s’. Oh, it was such an exciting
time to be in town. We were jazzed just to be playing a part.

By February of the following  year, the others members of the Mark V would choose to go
their separate ways, and  Jimmy and I would continue to record as the PTC . In the fall of
1967, with the addition of Casey Cunningham, and Greg Tornquist, the classic Lollipop Train 45 1)line-up
of the band would be in place. In November we would set to wax the haunting ‘Baby,
You Come Rollin’ Across My Mind’ which would change everything, and give us the
green light to record the critically acclaimed Peppermint Trolley Company album
in 1968. Over the years the LP would gain cult status as a classic of psyche rock, baroque
rock and sunshine pop (terms that would be coined decades later). In 2009 it would be
gloriously reissued under the title ‘Beautiful Sun’ for Steve Stanley’s Now Sound Records.

As of this writing, Jimmy, Casey, Greg and I are all still alive and well, as are the former
members of the Mark V.  Sadly we lost Patrick McClure a few years ago. Though Pat had
been in PTC  only briefly (He appears with us in the‘Beverly Hillbillies” episode), his song
writing was essential to the artistic success of the album. He is dearly missed.

It warms my soul to know that fifty years after we pulled up to the curbside at Selma and
Cosmo to embark on a new adventure, the music of the Peppermint Trolley Company is
still rolling across people’s minds. Long live the PTC!

Love and Harmony,

Danny Faragher

 

 

Peppermint_Trolley_Company _album

Bones (the rock band) video of hit – ‘Roberta’

March 3, 2016 in Happenings

Bones cover

Album photo and design by Phil Hartman

 

My brother Jimmy and I led four different bands.
Although each group was fun to be a part of, the experience as a member of Bones was probably the most exciting. We were four young guys chasing a dream full throttle in a rapidly changing world. Oh, those halcyon days!

The four of us, Jimmy Faragher, Casey Cunningham, Greg Tornquist, and myself, were already a seasoned studio band, having charted a hit record in 1968 with Baby, You Come Rollin’ Across my Mind, and recorded a future cult classic with the eponymously titled album,  The Peppermint Trolley Company.  However, there is no resting on one’s laurels in the music business. We were creatively restless, and felt boxed in, confined within the four walls of the studio. Full of fire and eager to take our music to the streets, we chose to walk away from our contract and not look back, changing both our moniker and our direction.scan

It took us a couple years of wood shedding and playing dives to find that direction, but find it we did. We became a great live act. Crowds flooded to venues like Gazzarri’s, the Whiskey, the Topanga Corral, and the Venice Beach House to listen and dance to Bones. In concerts as an opening act for artists like Little Richard,  Alice Cooper, Canned Heat, and the Eagles, the band always projected a visceral excitement that was contagious.

Through it all we remained a tight recording unit, always arranging  our songs as if we were making records. We great material to work with. Jimmy, the main writer in the group was churning out quality song after quality song. In 1972 the groups first album, Bones, produced by Richard Perry, was released on Artie Mogul’s Signpost label. The following year, after adding our former Trolley mate, guitarist Patrick McClure to the band, we released a second LP,  Waitin’ Here, produced by Vini Poncia (Future producer on three of the four Faragher Brothers albums), on MCA.Bones - 1973 - Waitin' Here

 

Roberta, the hit single, and first release, was the result of  a spontaneous and unrehearsed rendition of the Huey Piano Smith song at the suggestion of producer Perry. He’d heard me singing the tune and thought it might capture some of that live excitement.  It’s the rock and roll side of Bones.

The band’s hybrid sound, an amalgamation of rock, power pop, and soul, was way ahead of it’s time, and provided a template for the Faragher Brothers to step into. The music biz connections the band had cultivated didn’t hurt, either.

So why does Bones seem to be lost to history? I believe part of it is the lack of visual documentation. There are simply very few photos and, unlike both the Peppermint Trolley and the Faragher Brothers, there is no footage of the band (Strange to contemplate a world where folks aren’t catching every moment with iPhones or video cams!). Being more of a counter culture phenomenon Bones never appeared on television. Thankfully, the music still remains.

With pride I recall how committed we were to the idea of peace and social justice. We not

Bones - Opening for Peace Rally - Oceanside, CA - May, 1970

Bones – Opening for Peace Rally – Oceanside, CA – May, 1970

only talked the talk, but in performing pro bono at numerous peace rallies for the cause, we walked the walk. We were a band of brothers. On a mission. Committed to the power of rock and roll and its ability to bring people together. We lived together, made music together, and at times,  starved together. Through the good times and the hard times we had each other’s backs. Bones lives!

Watch Roberta video.

bones_bio_4

 

 

Faragher Brothers Perform ‘Stay the Night’ and ‘Open Your Eyes’

February 11, 2016 in Events, Happenings

In the Spring of 1979 the Faragher Brothers – Danny, Jimmy,
Tommy, and Davey. along with younger Albums-31 copysiblings, Pammy, and Marty filmed a video for the release of their first Polydor album – Open Your Eyes. It was the band’s third LP.  Spirits were high. Not only had they gotten a second record contract,they’d reunited with producer Vini Poncia, as well.  The vibe in the studio had been positive and full of creativity and fun.

Watch as they perform Stay the Night and Open Your Eyes. Apologies for the poor quality of the tape. We’re just glad it came to light.

Love and Harmony,
The Faragher Brothers

Albums-25

P.F.Sloan, Lollipop Train, and the Peppermint Trolley Company

December 10, 2015 in Happenings, Thoughts

I was saddened to hear of the recent passing of P.F. Sloan. This was one talented guy – singer/songwriter/ guitarist/ producer.
He never p.f.sloan1achieved the public acclaim that he so richly deserved,but he is deeply respected today by musicians and musicologists. Although I never met the man, I am proud to have had a small musical connection with him through the Peppermint Trolley Company’s single release of Lollipop Train.

After a meteoric rise to prominence in the music business, Sloan seemingly disappeared from the scene for decades, only to reappear later with his talent intact. Here is a brief background on the man:

Originally  from New Jersey, Sloan’s family moved to West Hollywood in 1957 when he was 12. At 13 he began playing guitar, and a year later, while at Wallach’s Music City, he ran into Elvis Presley, who graciously gave him an impromptu lesson. He recorded his first rock and roll single for the  R&B label, Aladdin that same year.

In the early sixties he became a session back-up singer and guitarist and part of the famed circle known as the Wrecking Crew. As a staff writer for Screen Gems he formed a partnership with songwriter, Steve Barri, and the team had their  first hit  with Kick that Little Foot, Sally, Sally by R&B singer, Round Robin. They also recorded their own surf album as the Fantastic Baggies.

As songwriters Sloan and Barri were stylistically versatile and their ears must have been keenly attentive to where things were going, for by the mid-sixties they were writing in a style that  would soon be called folk rock, a genre which had its roots in New York’s Greenwich Village, but which really blossomed on the West Coast. Folk rock was America’s first artistic counter punch to the British Invasion  The team penned a slew of hits for various artists such as The Searchers, Jan and Dean, Hermits’s Hermits, the Turtles, the Grassroots, and the Mamas and Papas.  But it was Eve of Destruction, the multi-million-seller protest song performed by Barry McGuire that put the partnership, and Sloan in particular, on the map.  For a brief time between 1965 and 1967 the songwriting team had its finger on the pulse of youth culture, infusing pop music with the street  savvy sensibility of the poet/outsider.

In the summer of 1966, my brother Jimmy and I, along with our band, the Peppermint Trolley Company were fortunate to get the chance to record and release Sloan-Barri composition, ‘Lollipop Train’, as a single on Valiant Records. We were so jazzed to get the chance to interpret one of his tunes, and considered  producer Dan Dalton’s securing of the song a major coup.

‘Lollipop Train’ was one of those snarling put-downs, and Jimmy, all of seventeen, is sufficiently edgy
with his lead vocal… Lollipop Train 45 1)

You better roll it over in your mind carefully
Before you say that you can do far better than me
Look at the queen in her ragged gown
Demanding to her jester a crown to hold

Don’t you complain. Don’t let me hear you complain
You’re riding on a lollipop train and you never had it so good

In our arrangement  the tune unexpectedly veers into a slightly psychedelic direction.   Dalton, who thought the song was a perfect fit for our band got the idea to change the meter to  3/4 in the final line of the chorus.  With Jimmy, Buzz Clifford and I softly harmonizing, the tune briefly morphs into a trippy kaleidoscopic waltz, and then … thump, thump, thump, thump… it returns to its straight ahead acerbic delivery. It’s a folk/psychedelic rock hybrid, and anticipates the classic Peppermint Trolley sound of two years later.  The ’66 band was the P.T.C.’s first incarnation. with band members Jimmy Faragher, bass, Steve Hauser, sax and acoustic guitar, Dave Kelliher, trumpet and electric guitar, Brad Madson, piano, Dick Owens, drums, and me on trombone and harmonica.

We performed all the horn parts ourselves. Dave and I  each  over-dubbing  three tracks that were later  ping ponged to one.  Brad  found the right sound on the B3 organ to compliment the arrangement.

The record, though not a hit, did receive some airplay, and the connection with Sloan added a certain cachet. British born D.J.,  John Ravencroft (later to gain fame as John Peel), spun the record  on KMEN, San Bernardino, our hometown station, and let everyone know who’d written the song.

I listened to the record recently and really dug it. I think it stands up. So… get on board the Lollipop Train!

After decades of illness, P.F. Sloan resurfaced, recording, giving interviews and playing select concerts. PepperminTrolleyCompanyValiant
Here’s to the genius of P.F. Sloan. The world will miss the man, but the music lives on.

Listen. and watch.

 

 

 

 

 

Former Peppermint Trolley Co. and Bones Member, Greg Tornquist recalls meeting B.B. King

May 18, 2015 in Events, Happenings, Thoughts

BB and Greg 1  111111

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Received an email yesterday from Greg Torquist, my former band mate in both the Peppermint Trolley Company and Bones in which he recalls our opening for B.B. King at the Whiskey a Go Go in the early seventies,  as well as a later chance meeting with the great man.

Hey Bones Brothers!

I was saddened to learn that BB passed away yesterday.  Age: 89.
We met twice.
The first was when we opened for him at the Whiskey.  Maybe 1971 or 72 ?
Shook hands with him in the dressing room.  I’ve never forgotten his catcher mitt handshake.  After our set when we were heading up the stairs and he was coming down he stopped and complimented me on my playing.  May have been the slide on ‘He Said’.  BB knew songs.  We played good ones and he couldn’t have escaped our roar because you could hear the band on stage in the dressing rooms.  I think he just dug good music.
I wore that compliment like an invisible badge of honor.  Still do.
Then we were introduced by a friend in LA about 3 or 4 years ago.  We met in an optometrist office.
Spoke for around 20 minutes.  Privately.  I explained that I had written a musical called Mississippi and asked for his advice.  He was encouraging.  Enthusiastic even.  Told me to send a copy to his bodyguard so he could actually listen and read it.  
I never did.  Writers angst that it wasn’t quite good enough.  I am rewriting even now.  Oy!
What a wonderful man.  Not just a trail blazing iconic musical hero but a great man.
Peace
gBB and Greg 2   111111

BB and Greg and Nic   11:11:11 copy

The Faragher Brothers ‘Givin’ It Up’ and Gettin’ Funky

April 3, 2015 in Events, Happenings, Thoughts

The Faragher Brothers ‘Yellow album’ is jam packed with great songs. The LP is a harmonious blend of grooves – soulful. jazzy, mellow, steppin’ – but each  one stands on its own, shining like a jewel.

The Faragher Brothers performing Live at The Roxy - Spring 1976

The Faragher Brothers performing Live at The Roxy – Spring 1976

‘Give It Up’  shows off the funkier, grittier side of the band. Recorded in 1975 at Richard Perry’s Studio 55. the players are: Danny Faragher -B3 organ, lead vocal, Tommy Faragher – clavinet, bg vocal, Davey Faragher – bass, bg vocal, Jimmy Faragher – bg vocal, Patrick McClure – electric guitar, John King – drums, Charles Crewes – talking guitar, Vini Poncia – producer.

‘C’mon! C’mon! C’mon, Baby! Give it on up!’

‘Get ready! You got to get ready!’

 

 

Watch and listen to ‘Give It Up’ video.

The Faragher Brothers outside Brothers Studios in Redondo Beach, preparing for the concert at the Roxy

The Faragher Brothers outside Brothers Studios in Redondo Beach, preparing for the concert at the Roxy

Faragher Brothers ‘Yellow Album’ Review. A Classic.

April 1, 2015 in Events, Happenings, Thoughts, Uncategorized

Our first LP – the eponymous ‘The Faragher Brothers’ aka ‘Yellow Album’ was the the culmination of three years of wood shedding. Countless hours (many of them spent in the The 'Yellow Album' - 1976basement of our folk’s house in Redlands) went into writing, arranging, and honing the sound that would emerge on our first release.  Although the record never gained the status it deserved, it has remained a cult classic. The Japanese Sony reissue of 2000  sold out immediately. As of this writing, a new copy ships for $300.00+.

One listen will tell you why the record has become a classic. It is timeless – artistically pristine, yet soulful and heartfelt. We were the real deal, and I am proud to have been part of it.  The fact that were able to get so much of our music down on wax makes all the sacrifices worthwhile.  

I would like to express our gratitude to our all our loyal fans who have kept the flame burning and spread the word over the years. Thank-you, thank-you. We  love you! For those of you who have expressed frustration at not being able to purchase the music there is good news. A reissue of the entire Faragher Brothers catalog is in the works. Keep your fingers crossed!

Here is a review of the album written by Beverly Paterson for the online mag, ‘SomethingElse’.

 

 

DECEMBER 28, 2014 BY BEVERLY PATERSON

The Faragher Brothers –Faragher Bros (1976): Forgotten series

Actual siblings, the Faragher Brothers starred Jimmy on vocals, Danny on vocals, keyboards, trombone and percussion, Tommy on vocals and piano, and Davey on vocals and bass. Hailing from Redlands, California, these guys had been staples of the scene for over a decade, particularly Jimmy and Danny, having acquired national fame with the Peppermint Trolley Company. 1969 saw the band score a hit single with “Baby You Come Rollin’ Across My Mind,” while their solitary album, The Peppermint Trolley Company, is a masterpiece of its era.

Although the Peppermint Trolley Company specialized in psychedelic pop a la the Left Banke and the Strawberry Alarm Clock, the boys had solid backgrounds in many different styles. Come the early 70s, they pursued their appreciation of soul music with ardent fervor, and signed a deal with ABC Records, resulting in a pair of albums. A real family affair, the band later added brother Marty and sister Pamela to the line-up, and were now employed by the Polydor label where they released two albums before dispersing.

But the album we’re currently discussing is the debut effort, Faragher Bros, which is also often referred to as “The Yellow Album.” Produced by Vini Poncia, who played in notable ’60s bands such as the Trade Winds and the Innocents, penned tunes for the likes of the Ronettes, Tommy James, and Leo Sayer, and worked with Ringo Starr, Melissa Manchester and Kiss, the disc not only perfectly captures the vibe of the hour, but further characterizes the band’s impeccable chemistry and multiple talents.

Torched by a funky undercurrent, wired with stabbing horns and sweeping choruses, “Best Years Of My Life” launches Faragher Bros off in splendid shape as the catchy track homes right in on every aspect of the band’s abilities. Beautifully breathy harmonies, compounded by smart and striking arrangements sparkle forth on “In Your Time Of Need,” fiery funk grooves encompass “Give It Up,” and “Please Hurry Up” mixes reggae beats with sweet soul sensations to satisfying effects. Set to a jazzy motif, “You Touched Me” projects a sexy feel, a version of Curtis Mayfield’s “It’s All Right” remains loyal to its springy and carefree complexion, and “Never Get Your Love Behind Me” soars to a smooth and polished finish.

Emotionally charged singing, derived straight from the gut, joined by locked-in instrumentation and pin-sharp hooks make Faragher Bros an album where each number explodes with radio-friendly qualities. Having researched their Temptations, Isley Brothers, O’Jays, Barry White, and Earth, Wind and Fire records well, and transpiring their knowledge and talent into action, these guys were the genuine article.

Upon hearing Faragher Bros, you’ll no doubt be puzzled as to why the band didn’t crack the big time. Truth be told, image has a lot to do with success, and the group’s hippy jam band look, which entailed long hair, puka shells, and jeans, just didn’t jive with the slick and classy soul sounds they so stunningly sang and performed. Marketing and promotion be darned, Faragher Bros is an outstanding collection of sincere soul music and is primed for rediscovery.'The Yellow Album' - Backside

 

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 with “Stand By Me” — which is actually one of her favorite songs, especially John Lennon’s version. She’s contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as Rock Beat International’s associate editor. Paterson has also published Inside Out, and Twist & Shake. Contact Something Else!

The ‘Dancing with the Moment’ Release Party Big Success. Thank-you!

March 9, 2015 in Events, Happenings

 

Blowin'HarpatRecordRelease

Blowin’ Up a Storm at Record Release Party. Photo by Taylor Series

Thanks to everyone who braved the rare L.A. rain to come and be a part of the ‘Dancing with the Moment’ Record Release celebration! We had us a party!  Yes, the house was rockin’, and there was delicious food, fine wine, and good vibes galore.  I was truly touched to see such a gathering of friends, family, and colleagues. Connecting once again with familiar faces and meeting new people was a treat , indeed.  From the bottom of my heart, I thank-you one and all! For me the album is a creative milestone. It is the culmination of years of intense focus and hard work.  My son, and creative partner, Bryan Faragher, and I had spent many a night burning the midnight oil, and it was a project that at times appeared to be never ending.  Knowing that we were able to cross that finish line filled me a with a deep sense of accomplishment and satisfaction. The occasion called for a soiree and a soiree we had.

Let me give a shout of appreciation to the party guests: Bryan Faragher, Jimmy Faragher, Tommy Faragher, Rosie Bliss, Davey Faragher, Pammy Faragher, Marty M. Faragher, Anita Faragher, Tibo Cuellar,  Jeanne Harriott, Connie Catalan, Emily, Deena McClain, Nick Lane, Dave Armstrong, Alec Echevarria, Shervin Ahdout, Jordan Faragher, Tim Horrigan, Anne Horrigan, Emily Horrigan, Chris Blondal, Craig Copeland, Randy Crenshaw, Denia Bradshaw, Probyn Gregory, Steve Hauser, Michelle Hauser, Michael McClure, Jody Mortara, Ted, Bill New, Phil Elmore, Donna Duessen, Harry McNeil, Kristine Chinn, Chuck Nickerson, Babbet t Goss, Brent, Bryan Davis, Mellie, Adam, Dierdra, Willard Lewis Snow, Irene, Josh Buehler, Lauren Wong, Rick, Linda Hubbard, Annie, Lindsey.

Bryan aptly stepped into the DJ role, playing original music as he projected a visual slide show, and handled the MC duties with aplomb. His sincere introduction touched my heart.

Tibo Cuellar, who was first to air tracks off ‘Dancing with the Moment’ on his ‘Cold Cuts’ show on radio  KCSB made the trek all the way down from Santa Barbara to make his warm and personable presence felt.  Always great to see him!

Some very talented singers and musicians joined me on stage to perform, including siblings: Jimmy – guitar and vocals, Pammy – vocals, Tommy – piano, Davey – bass and vocals, and Marty – percussion,  my son, Bryan – percussion, and friends: Tim Horrigan – bass, Chris Blondal – drums, Denia Bradshaw – flute, Randy Crenshaw – spoken word, and Craig Copeland  – guitar, (Randy and Craig, along with Bill New, who was in the audience, are members of my doo wop singing group, Daddy Cool). We debuted our energetic new video of  the hard groovin’  ‘Too Much Pressure’ , and it received an enthusiastic response from the crowd.  The video was directed by Bryan,  and filmed by Shervin Ahdout, with assistance from Alec Echevaria.

We also premiered  the exciting dance mix of the same song, and the infectious and driving rhythm brought people to the dance floor. Copies of ‘too much pressure – rebel sole pressurized underground mix’  were free to all party guests.

The party couldn’t have  happened without the help of the following people: Anita Faragher, who got the word out; my wife Jeanne, who tirelessly shopped, and personally sewed the table covers from scratch; my daughter Deena, who planned and spent all day Saturday preparing the food platters (a feast for the eyes as well as the palette); Connie Catalan who helped to organize and lend a hand where needed, and, I might add, first came up with the suggestion of throwing a release party; Nick Lane, who helped to serve the food; Alexander, who tended the bar, Alec Echevarria, our roaming photographer, and Shervin Ahdout, who assisted Bryan with the visuals. Thank-you;  Dave Armstrong for videoing the performance, and Taylor Series, and  Michael McClure for photos.  If anyone else  has photos or video, please let us know. We would love to share it.

Love and Harmony,
Danny

'Dancing with the moment, and the moment sets me free.'

‘Dancing with the moment, and the moment sets me free.’

Peppermint Trolley Company on Boss KHJ Aircheck – June 5, 1968 -UPDATE

June 13, 2014 in Events, Happenings

Luxuriapng

Gary Schneider, host of the show, Open Mynd Excursion  (Luxuria Music, Wednesday, 9:00 – 11:00 pm PST) delights listeners each week by playing a recording drawn from his vast collection of radio air checks.Recently he featured an air check from June 5, 1968 of Boss Radio KHJ, in which the Peppermint Trolley Company’s hit “Baby You Come Rollin’ Across My Mind”  was aired.(approximately 15 minutes in) The DJ was L.A. radio legend, the Real Don Steele. The artists on the program represent a myriad of styles, from the Fifth Dimension to Cream. from  the Stones to Tiny Tim. It is a fascinating time capsule in sound.

Click play below to listen to this blast from the past:
Courtesy of Gary Schneider of Luxuriamusic.com

 

KHJtop30

Back in the sixties 93 KHJ was king of the L. A. airwaves They were the biggest, baddest top forty station on the West Coast. If your record got played on Boss Radio, you had  a very large foot in the door. That this giant would put our little ol’ 45 on their playlist was was like manna from heavden.

We had recorded “Baby, You Come Rollin’…” in November of 1967, and the single was released early in ’68. Though we believed in the record – it was heartfelt, honest, and catchy as hell –  It hadn’t caused much of a stir, and by May we had all but given up on it. In the meantime, we were living in a rat infested band house in Silver Lake. In spite of being poverty stricken and undernourished, we’d managed to maintain a creative regimen of writing, arranging, and rehearsing new material with the intention and hope of releasing an LP. Our manager/producer , Dan Dalton tried selling ACTA president, Kenny Myers on the idea, but Myers, being an old school record man,  was reluctant. I remember sitting in Dalton’s tiny office, when Dan got the call from Myers that nixed the idea. Talk about feeling dejected, it looked like the end of the line for the Trolley. Then something strange happened, something out of a feel-good fantasy  movie.  The phone rang  again  a couple of minutes later.  It was Myers,once more, but this time he was eager to green light the album.  Why? It seems that , just like its title, “Baby You Come Rollin’ Across my Mind” had been quietly rolling from region to region over the past four months, gradually picking up steam. It was a number one hit in Louisville, Kentucky. Bill Drake, the top forty consultant with an uncanny knack for picking hits, had fallen in love with the record. To a number of stations located in major cities, Drake’s word was gospel; they trusted him implicitly. KHJ was putting our single into rotation as of that very night, and  not only was Boss Radio jumping on the record, so was the entire Drake Chain.

Baby You Come RollinjpgThat night we heard our record played on the radio. A few days later we were appearing on television.  By June 5, the date of this air check,  we were still holding our own among such classics as Sunshine of Your Love, Jumpin’ Jack Flash, and Mrs. Robinson. It’s sad and eerie knowing now that tragedy was about to strike. On the following night of June 6, having wrapped up a recording session at Moonglow Studios (probably for the album cut, Put Your Burden Down), we heard the heartbreaking news over the car radio that Bobby Kennedy had been shot. To quote Dickens – ‘It was the best of times. It was the worst of times.”

Peace,
Danny Faragher